The History Woman's Blog

Conference: Medieval and Early Modern Authorship, 30 June-2 July

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern, literature by thehistorywoman on May 2, 2010

Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies

Medieval and Early Modern Authorship

30 June – 2 July 2010, University of Geneva

Authorship has come to the forefront of medieval and early modern English studies in recent years, as is shown by the wealth of important publications in this area. The objective of this conference is to take stock of a duly socialized form of  authorship, which recognizes that while authors have agency, that agency is circumscribed by the multi-faceted social, legal, institutional, and intertextual pressures within which authorship takes place.

Plenary Speakers

Colin Burrow (University of Oxford)

‘Fictions of Collaboration: Authors and Editors in the Sixteenth Century’

Patrick Cheney (Pennsylvania State University)

‘English Authorship and the Early Modern Sublime’

Helen Cooper (Cambridge University)

‘Choosing Poetic Fathers: the English Problem’

Rita Copeland (University of Pennsylvania)

‘Producing the lector

Katherine Duncan-Jones (University of Oxford)

‘Authorial Impersonation: Three Faces of Henry Chettle’

Robert Edwards (Pennsylvania State University)

‘Authorship, Imitation, and Refusal in Late-Medieval England’

Neil Forsyth (University of Lausanne)

‘Authorship from Homer to Wordsworth via Milton’

Alastair Minnis (Yale University)

‘Ethical Poetry, Poetic Theology: A Crisis of Medieval Authority’

Brian Vickers (School of Advanced Study, University of London)

‘Collocation Matching: A Breakthrough in Authorship Attribution Studies’

For more information go to:  http://home.adm.unige.ch/~erne/authorship2010/

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