The History Woman's Blog

Shakespeare, Chaucer and Joyce: A Conference on Medieval and Early Modern Authorship

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern, literature by thehistorywoman on July 3, 2010

If it has never occurred to you that Chaucer might have influenced Joyce as much as Homer then you should read more medieval literature – or listen to Helen Cooper (Cambridge). Even though Joyce decided to name his Ulysses after Homer’s classical Odyssey, Cooper argues, his true ‘poetic father’ in the English language was Chaucer, and the Canterbury Tales served as a model for the chapters in Ulysses, each of which is based on a different character or location, using different language and style.

I must say I have learnt quite a few new things over the past few days in Geneva, where the Second Biennial Conference of the Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (Samemes) shed new light on aspects of ‘Medieval and Early Modern Authorship’. Colin Burrow (Oxford), for instance, called into question the notion of an emergent ‘individual authorship’ in the early modern period and emphasised the collaborative nature of early modern textual production. In particular, authors worked closely with the editors and printers of their works and thus were close collaborators with the press rather than detached artists.

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Conference: Medieval and Early Modern Authorship, 30 June-2 July

Posted in Conferences, Early Modern, literature by thehistorywoman on May 2, 2010

Swiss Association of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies

Medieval and Early Modern Authorship

30 June – 2 July 2010, University of Geneva

Authorship has come to the forefront of medieval and early modern English studies in recent years, as is shown by the wealth of important publications in this area. The objective of this conference is to take stock of a duly socialized form of  authorship, which recognizes that while authors have agency, that agency is circumscribed by the multi-faceted social, legal, institutional, and intertextual pressures within which authorship takes place.

Plenary Speakers

Colin Burrow (University of Oxford)

‘Fictions of Collaboration: Authors and Editors in the Sixteenth Century’

Patrick Cheney (Pennsylvania State University)

‘English Authorship and the Early Modern Sublime’

Helen Cooper (Cambridge University)

‘Choosing Poetic Fathers: the English Problem’

Rita Copeland (University of Pennsylvania)

‘Producing the lector

Katherine Duncan-Jones (University of Oxford)

‘Authorial Impersonation: Three Faces of Henry Chettle’

Robert Edwards (Pennsylvania State University)

‘Authorship, Imitation, and Refusal in Late-Medieval England’

Neil Forsyth (University of Lausanne)

‘Authorship from Homer to Wordsworth via Milton’

Alastair Minnis (Yale University)

‘Ethical Poetry, Poetic Theology: A Crisis of Medieval Authority’

Brian Vickers (School of Advanced Study, University of London)

‘Collocation Matching: A Breakthrough in Authorship Attribution Studies’

For more information go to:  http://home.adm.unige.ch/~erne/authorship2010/